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Residential Design – Multi Unit: up to Six Dwellings

Emmerson

Winner:
Residential Design – Multi Unit: up to Six Dwellings
Winner: M G Design & Building Pty Ltd

(03) 5261 3304
www.mgdesignandbuild.com.au
Photographer: Chris Groenhout

The client wanted two dwellings on a large site: one double-storey; the other single-storey to be a detached one-bedroom house for parents and additional guests. They wanted a contemporary design, with orientation to the coastal views, and wanted a pool and BBQ area, with decks designed for all weather conditions. Large open living areas were requested, with separate parents/children zones.

Site excavation and nestling the house into the landscape allowed the level areas that were required to incorporate the additional dwelling and the pool/BBQ area. Deck locations on both levels allow year-round enjoyment. Almost every space, including the main shower, has expansive coast and hinterland views. The overall outcome has a resort-like feel. The dwellings complement each other as they wrap around the pool and the external spaces, flowing into the internal. The external surrounds, internal finishes and detailing are equally pleasing to the eye.

“The design of the Emmerson Beach Houses has cleverly sited two dwellings so that, to the streetscape, they appear as one dwelling whilst from adjacent properties to the rear of the site respect view sharing corridors,” said the Judges.

“The second dwelling is sensitively designed and sited so the response ensures a subservient relationship to the main dwelling.”

“The internal and external flow between rooms and spaces allows for connectivity and interaction occupants of both dwellings.”

“The design response of the main dwelling has cleverly captured the primary views of the coast and hinterland and integrated the relationship of the built form to its surrounds.”